Do We Need Dairy?  The Plight of Farmed Animals.

Do We Need Dairy?
The Plight of Farmed Animals.

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

Do We Need Dairy?
The Plight of Farmed Animals.

posted by the JP Family | February 26, 2021

Our mission is to help people connect and understand the plight of farmed animals.

You can help by sharing their story

In the dairy industry, literally millions live in housing that is not natural, they are in confinement, their baby’s are taken from them, their tails are docked without pain medication, they do not always get adequate care and in many places the treatment they receive is horrific.

These social creatures are looked at as commodities, therefore they are treated below what most believe are humane standards. They are impregnated every year and within hours will be detached from their offspring. After continuous impregnation and milking most dairy cows are deemed as spent after 5 years and then sent to slaughter. If given the opportunity cattle can live a life span of twenty five years or longer. Cows are social animals and develop very close bonds and family relationships just like humans.

Dairy industry statistics

  • “In the U.S., more than 29 million cows suffer and die in the meat and dairy industries every year.”(1)
  • “The number of milk cows in the United States is approximately 9.4 million.” (2)
  • “Of the 9 million dairy cows in the U.S., 3 million are slaughtered each year at only a fraction of their natural lifespan.” (3)
  • Females born into the dairy industry will become dairy cows while male calves are seen as byproducts and either get slaughtered straight away or become veal meat. “About 700,000 veal calves are slaughtered in the United States annually…at up to three weeks of age and from…around 16-18 weeks.” (4)

Below is a story from our Caregiver Jenny Chambers that we wanted to share with you about a Mom and her baby on a dairy farm.

“Allie had 10 babies taken from her & was milked for 10 years before rescued.. …

Her Baby

by Jenny Chambers

She had carried her baby for the whole 9 months in anticipation and the day had finally arrived for her to welcome a new life into the world. The bond is immediate and she’s hit with an overwhelming sense of love and devotion. She wasn’t sure she could ever feel that way again, not after the last time, but gazing into the eyes of her newborn baby girl, she knew she would do anything she could to protect her. She prayed that her perfect daughter wouldn’t have the same upbringing she’d had and she prayed even harder that her perfect daughter wouldn’t meet the same fate as her last baby.

About a year ago, she had given birth to a baby boy and she loved him more than anything. Those first few days of motherhood had been the most rewarding days she’d ever experienced. She would comfort him when he cried, keep him warm when he got cold and spent hours just watching him sleep, folded up as small as he could get. So angelic. So peaceful. So innocent.

She’d been just getting into her stride when it came to being a mother, three days of paradise and it seemed like becoming a mum had made up for her own traumatic childhood. In those three days, she forgot about all of it; the way she had been callously taken from her own mother, when she herself was a baby; how she had been completely powerless against her captors as they’d beaten her. And yet, in that moment, it all had a purpose and as she looked down upon this child of her very own, it had all been worth it.

Evan was seen as a ‘byproduct’ of the dairy industry before rescued.

Her elation had been short lived. She’d tried to ignore the way her mind wondered to what her captors would do with her newborn son. He was hers, not theirs. But when they came in, that third day, nothing could have prepared her for the heartbreak. Her whole world collapsed around her and there was nothing she could have done to stop it. She’d begged and pleaded for them not to take her baby but they grabbed hold of him and tore him away. No tenderness. No kindness. No warmth. She reached the devastating realisation that she was completely at their mercy… and these people had no mercy. She cried for days, not knowing where her baby was, whether he was ok, whether she would ever see him again. By the time her tears had run dry and her heart had hurt so much she wondered how it was still beating, she knew she would never see her son again.

So here she was, just a short year later with a beautiful baby girl. She was relishing in motherhood once again and vowed never to let her captors take her away. She had a plan this time and she was putting all her faith into the plan working. The plan had to work. So when her captors came, she was ready. There were two of them but the unconditional love she was feeling for her baby girl had translated into the strength of thousands and she wasn’t going to let anything or anyone get in her way. She stood still at first, panicked, as one of her captors eyeballed her baby. As soon as he took his first step towards her, she ran straight at him, with all the force she could conjure up but before her bowed down head had the chance to strike, an indescribable pain shot through her legs and she fell to the floor. She tried perilously to get back up as she watched that man take ahold of her baby, with the same disregard witnessed just a year before. As she tried to find her feet and make another attempt, the captor, not holding her baby, hit her with the metal pole again. He did it with such force it made her whole body shake, so much so, she could see stars. He hit her again… and again. She could see blood, her own blood, splattering against the walls yet all she could think about was getting her baby back so she could protect her, console her. It was no use. And in the blink of an eye, her baby was gone. They had left her with nothing all over again. The pain she endured from the beating was nothing in comparison to the pain she felt inside, failing her baby again. She’d been wrong when she’d thought she could never feel as heartbroken, as when her son was stolen. That feeling hit her like a freight train. She couldn’t help wondering why. Why were they doing this to her? She had never done anything to them. Yet they had taken her from her mother when she’d needed her the most and now, they were ripping her babies from her, over and over again. No remorse. No compassion. No feeling. What was it all for? The beatings… The rape… The kidnapping…

As she sunk deeper into an impenetrable depression, the days of crying passed by, one at a time, not getting any easier. She called out for hours and hours for her daughter but no one was listening. She was gone. Her captors would come and go, blatantly ignoring her desperate cries as they forcibly hook her up to an invasive, painful machine and take the milk that was meant for her baby.

— Jenny Chambers

Solutions

If you were moved by any part of this piece, please know that you can help all farmed animals.

Here are some examples:

  1. Try vegan / plant-based meals. If you don’t know where to start, please ask us as we have delicious recipes and easy tips!
  2. You can be an advocate for animal rights by writing your local legislators to help farmed animals live better lives. There are many bills and petitions to sign. Legislation helps to ensure lasting results.
  3. Explore online for cruelty-free products.
  4. Support farmed animal sanctuaries.

Together we can make compassionate impactful choices.

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Love,
the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary family ❤️

References

  1. PETA, n.d., Cows used for food, 23 February 2021, <https://www.peta.org/issues/animals-used-for-food/factory-farming/cows/>.
  2. United States Department of Agriculture 2021, All Cattle and Calves inventory: United States, 23 February 2021, <https://www.nass.usda.gov/Newsroom/printable/2021/01-29-2021.pdf>.
  3. Capps, A., 2014, 10 Dairy Facts the Industry Doesn’t Want You to Know, viewed 23 February 2021, <https://freefromharm.org/dairyfacts/>.
  4. Woodstock Farm Animal Sanctuary, n.d., Calves for veal, 25 February 2021, <https://woodstocksanctuary.org/learn/animals-used-for-food/veal/#:~:text=About%20700%2C000%20veal%20calves%20are,slaughtered%20around%2016%2D18%20weeks>.

 

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt. 501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

The story of 6 rescued hens

posted by Jenny Chambers | December 5, 2020

I’ve always loved birds but I never knew quite how much joy I could get from watching 6 feathered tiny ‘dinosaurs’ fumble their way around their new world. Getting to know JP’s newest residents has been a delight but each time I look at their sweet little faces, it makes it even harder to understand their past.

You can help by sharing their story

A t one point, their sole purpose in life was to be slaughtered in the streets of Brooklyn, as part of a religious custom. An annual event, seeing thousands of chickens brought to the city, crammed in cages and deprived of food and water for anything up to a week before they face their grisly fate. I won’t go into too much detail as it is rather distressing but please visit endchickensaskaporos.com for more information. Every year, activists work tirelessly to bring this “tradition” to an end, as well as rescuing as many chickens as they can find loving homes for.

Which brings me to the JP 6…

These 6 Cornish hens were on their way to a cultural ritual that would end their lives

Sunshine, Joy, Isabella, Savannah, Rene and Hope – The newest lights of our lives at JP!

It’s easy to forget these guys are still babies as they’ve been through so much already; factory farms to transport trucks; crates in city streets to a basement and finally, they’ve made it to their permanent home with us. In anticipation of their arrival, JP co-founder, Oscar, renovated the chicken barn to accommodate the new residents. They now have their very own house, space to potter about in the grass and a dirt patch for dirt baths!

Crated at the cultural ritual & rescued in quarantine!

Taking care of Cornish Cross hens is not without challenges. They have been bred to put on so much weight, so rapidly, their legs can struggle to support their oversized bodies and if not properly handled, even their organs can fail them. This being said, it is paramount we restrict and monitor their diets closely, which isn’t always easy because they LOVE their food and we love giving them what they love!

We also had to adapt their house – the chickens already living at JP (Victor and Ava) love to perch on a high beam or nestle on top of hay bales but that’s not an option for the cornish girls as they can’t jump or fly very far, because of all that weight. We had to ensure they could still make themselves comfy though, so instead of high beams and bales they have groundlevel cubby holes and loose hay to snuggle in.

Safe & together at JP Farm Animal Sanctuary!

It is somewhat bittersweet when we think of those who were not so fortunate but having these survivors makes us want to do more for the millions of animals out there who need help.

Logistics aside, I think I speak for all the JP crew when I say, having these 6 little ladies come into our lives has been an absolute pleasure. Watching them become comfortable in their new surroundings, growing in confidence and beginning to show off their own quirky personalities leaves us all sharing constant updates on the new things they’ve done. Sitting in our laps, chasing us through the grass, eating new foods, walking up the ramp… each and every milestone is celebrated here at JP and it is not lost on us just how close they came to a very different, devastating end. It is somewhat bittersweet when we think of those who were not so fortunate but having these survivors makes us want to do more for the millions of animals out there who need help. We are forever grateful to all the New York activists who dedicate so much of their time, money and compassion to the animals and who went above and beyond to help us bring these girls home.

Love to All Beings,
Jenny & the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary Family

 

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt
501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!

Turkey talk with … Ronald and Bernard

Turkey talk with …
Ronald and Bernard

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

Turkey talk with …
Ronald and Bernard

posted by Lynn & Britt | November 1, 2020

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie and for short, R&B! There is always concern when we rescue farmed animals because we don’t always know what to expect.

T hey arrived in late September and since then we have watched and enjoyed seeing them get settled into their new forever home. We want to thank the Farm Sanctuary Adoption Network team for contacting us to potentially adopt these beautiful beings as their previous owners were no longer able to care for them.

Let’s welcome Ronnie & Bernie to the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary!

We heard their story and saw their picture and couldn’t say no. …

Oscar had been wanting to rescue turkeys for some time as their story is a tough one in the farmed animal production. An estimated 245 million turkeys raised and processed every year in the U.S. and have no federal legal protection. More than 46 million of them are processed each year at Thanksgiving alone, and more than 22 million at Christmas according to PETA. Ronnie and Bernie will never have to worry about those statistics as they will live out their lives with loads of love here at JP Farm Animal Sanctuary.

You can help by sharing their story

“More than 46 million turkeys are processed each year at Thanksgiving alone, and more than 22 million at Christmas according to PETA. …

Bernard is a beautiful soft black turkey who can be shy but when it comes to food he opens up and will eat right out of your hand! He also talks a lot in a sweet voice and since we are getting to know him, we are trying to figure out exactly what he is saying.

Ronald on the other hand opens his beautiful brown and off white feathers for viewing. When you sit with him he slowly dances around you till he gets really close. Then he will let you rub his keel (his tummy) for a bit. His head turns many colors, more than Bernard, this usually demonstrates his mood.

The day R&B arrived, transported by Farm Sanctuary caregivers. 🥰

We were concerned as it is hard to home two male turkeys but these two boys have been together for a while and really love each other, they are inseparable. They like to explore their new surroundings and listen to the pigs make some very loud and strange noises. In fact now the turkeys & pigs mingle together sometimes. We are slowly introducing them to the cows as well!

It is through their story that we want to share that all animals want to live and deserve the space, friendship and love that we all desire.

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Love to All Beings,
Britt, Lynn, Oscar & the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary Family

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt
501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!

Meet Victor & Ava: Why did the chickens cross the road?

Meet Victor & Ava: Why did the chickens cross the road?

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

Meet Victor & Ava: Why did the chickens cross the road?

posted by Britt & Lynn | August 20, 2020

One of our friends from Country Companions, our veterinarian office, called us over the summer and asked if we could take in a hen and a rooster. We didn’t have any place or structure where they could live so we suggested they keep looking. Long story short…no one could take them so they live here now and we couldn’t be happier!

Here is their story:

O ne of our veterinarian’s clients, Tania, called them to ask for help. She lives in a condominium complex and the tenants/condo management wanted to get rid of the free roaming chickens that had been living on the complex grounds for approximately a year and a half! She took it upon herself to feed them, became quite attached, and didn’t want them to be harmed in any way so she made it her mission to find them a forever home.

Watch the video of how Victor & Ava came to join our JP family

“… how they survived all this time, especially during winters, is absolutely amazing!”

Every once in a while chickens would randomly show up at the complex and then randomly disappear as the condo is located across the street from a meat farm (so they were escapees!). In February of 2018, two chickens, who have been named Ava, after Ava Gardner and Victor/Victoria, The latter is the name of an old movie where the actress played the part of a male. She settled on Victor once she realized he was not a hen. The management at the complex called the farm and told them to come get them and the farm said we don’t want them. Tania took it upon herself to make sure they always had food and water. Not knowing anything about chickens she researched how to care for them. They survived without a coop and at night would perch up in trees or hide under porches. Which is so crazy, usually chickens without coops get attacked by wildlife at night-even chickens with coops get attacked, so how they survived all this time, especially during winters, is absolutely amazing!

Tania said during the day they walked around the complex together, Victor never left Ava. He stood next to her while she ate and waited for her to finish before starting to eat himself, and when she took her dust bath in the complex gardens he stood next to her. She said it was like watching an old married couple, if they could have held hands they absolutely would have.

You can help by sharing their story

“She has never found any eggs and the other people in the complex have also stated that they have never seen eggs. With the timeline this would make Ava at the age of a non-laying chicken, which is usually 3 years old …

Some people at the complex had complained about Victor crowing early in the morning, which is when management told Tania they had to go, after reaching out to some rescues who said no, she emailed the hospital, which is when they called us.

The rest is history as Oscar completed building their ‘new condo’ (chicken coop) and they seem to love their new home! When they first arrived Oscar made a temporary room in the cow barn and they still have free range to walk around the cows. We love them and are so happy they will live out the rest of their lives here at JP Farm Animal Sanctuary!

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Love to All Beings,
Britt, Lynn, Oscar & the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary Family

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt
501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!

Meet Bruce and Evan

Meet Bruce and Evan

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

Meet Bruce and Evan

by Lynn Printy | May 19, 2020

You can help by sharing their story

W e are thrilled to share with you that we have two new residents, Bruce and Evan, through our relationship with the Farm Sanctuary’s Farm Animal Adoption Network. We have worked with them for the past year and were also introduced to Tallulah, our Scottish Highland cow who was rescued from a neglect case and DJ our pig who came from a college agricultural program.

Evan and Bruce ❤

We had the chance again to work with the Farm Sanctuary to adopt Bruce who was from a meat farm and Evan who came from the dairy industry. Both would have ended up on someone’s plate if they had not been rescued.

… they knew something was up

We were able to go to the Farm Sanctuary on the first of May to pick up Evan and Bruce and yes we all practiced social distancing, wearing masks and gloves. When we first met them they were outside playing and mooing, they knew something was up. They are so small, as I rubbed them I found that their hair was soft and they were such a delight to watch. They are curious and you can see they like to be around people. After we introduced ourselves to them the staff from the Farm Sanctuary easily got them into the trailer, they were locked in and we started our journey home.

With the crew at Farm Sanctuary

Bruce is part Scottish Highland and Angus mix, reddish in color with beautiful long eyelashes. Very easy going and loves to butt heads with Bruce. Evan is smart and very curious. His eyes are bright and big with an amazing sense of wonder when you look into them. The two boys really love being with each other and are inseparable. Bruce follows Evan and does whatever he does. They have started to run in the fields, try to smell and lick the other cows through the dividers, it really seems like they have settled into their new home. They are getting to know the other cows safely in the barn so when we finally let them all out in the fields together it should be an easy transition for everyone.We are happy to say that Bruce and Evan are now at their forever home.

Our mission is to help make an impact for animals by educating people on animal exploitation and to stop the inhumane treatment and killing of literally billions of animals a year.

We look forward to helping people find alternative food choices, by sharing plant based recipes and making kind food choices. And of course making connections with these beautiful living creatures that also just want to live their lives.

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Love to All Beings,
Lynn, Oscar & the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary Family

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt
501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!

Through the Lens of Compassion

Through the Lens of Compassion

LATEST UPDATES FROM THE FARM

Through the Lens of Compassion

posted by Britt Janssen & photographer Joel Anderson | Apr 30, 2020

You can help by sharing their story

Last autumn we received a message from Joel Anderson requesting to come to JP and photograph the hippy kids for his sanctuary collection (the resident Scottish Highland Cows and steers). We were excited to invite him over but for many reasons we just couldn’t schedule the right time between our calendar and the weather. In late February Joel contacted us again and we found a date for him to come in the beginning of March. Here is his experience…

S ince I began my Sanctuary project several years ago I’ve photographed at many rescues around the country. JP Farm Animal Sanctuary had been on my most wanted list since I saw their Instagram pics of the magnificent Hippy Kids, and I was able to squeak in a visit just before COVID-19 shut down travel.

Click image(s) to see the slideshow

“… This is a very special place and some very lucky animals.”

The phrase ‘gentle giants’ is overused but I can’t think of a better description for the highland cows at JP. During my day there I was able to get up close and personal with Tallulah, Grady, Ethan, Cara, Belle, and the sweet pigs Beanie Tofu, Dolphin, and DJ. I used a Hasselblad medium format film camera for most of the photographs, and have produced a new collection of handprinted darkroom photographs, now available on my website www.joelandersonphoto.com. All are limited editions, and I donate 10% of each sale back to JP Farm Animal Sanctuary. There is even a photograph of caretaker Britt grooming Tallulah, titled Tallulah’s Spa Day. When I posted that image on social media I had people telling me that would be their dream job so I thought offering an image to purchase would be a happy reminder.

Spending the day there and seeing the immense love and care that Lynn, Oscar, and Britt have for the animals was incredible. This is a very special place and some very lucky animals.

My photographs have received awards from the Royal Photographic Society (London), the Center for Fine Art Photography (Colorado), the Carnegie Museum of Natural History (Pennsylvania), among others. I exhibit my work at juried fine art festivals around the country.
– Joel

“Spending the day there and seeing the immense love and care that Lynn, Oscar, and Britt have for the animals was incredible. This is a very special place and some very lucky animals.”

Tallulah’s Spa Day ❤

Food and medical for the animals

We had a great time with Joel and appreciated how he captured the beauty and personalities of the furries and pinkies. Please consider purchasing a framed photograph of either Cara, Belle, Tallulah, Grady, Ethan, Beanie, Dolphin or DJ through this link: https://www.joelandersonphoto.com/shop-animals As Joel mentioned 10% of the purchase will go directly to JP which means food and medical for the animals whenever you decide to buy. He is also offering a 10% discount for you personally, if purchasing by May 30, 2020. Use this code at checkout: JPFARM

Joel does his own developing and framing which are expertly created and with a lot of care! Some of the pictures in this blog are not on his website so simply let Joel know which ones you are interested in by emailing him: joel@joelandersonphoto.com

Would you like to be a part of the sanctuary community? Sign up for our newsletter, write to us, share our sanctuary with others, volunteer or make a donation.

Love to All Beings,
Britt, Lynn, Oscar & the JP Farm Animal Sanctuary Family

Share the goodness, for goodness sake …. 😉

JP Farm Animal Sanctuary is a nonprofit, tax-exempt
501(c)(3) corporation (EIN 83-1674833)

More Moo! news and other happenings

Stay up-to-date with all the happenings on the farm.

See how our furry friends spend their days and never miss a story.

we love to share the joy

follow us around

The story of 6 rescued hens

The story of 6 rescued hens

We are excited to introduce you to Ronald and Bernard, affectionately called Ronnie and Bernie […]

Join our newsletter!